Catégories
La vie du chat

National Adopt A Shelter Pet Day: 6 Reasons To Adopt A Cat From A Shelter


Cat in a cage on national adopt a shelter pet day

(Picture Credit: RapidEye/Getty Images)

National Adopt A Shelter Pet Day happens on April 30th. It’s a day to get the word out about animals in shelters waiting for forever homes, and — hopefully — it’s a day for people to bring home new, furry family members.

The cat world is full of people who are all about the “Adopt, Don’t Shop” movement, which means they encourage people to visit their local shelter and adopt a cat in need, rather than splashing cash on some designer cat sold at a profit by a breeder.

So with Adopt A Shelter Pet Day approaching, here are six solid reasons to step up and rescue a homeless cat from your local shelter.

What other reasons should people adopt from the shelter? Will you spread the word about National Adopt A Shelter Pet Day? Let us know in the comments below!

Catégories
La vie du chat

National Pet Week: 7 Awesome Things You Can Do For Cats To Say Thanks


A girl wearing eyeglasses with her arms around her tabby cat

(Picture Credit: Getty Images)

National Pet Week is celebrated annually during the first full week of May. It was first started by the American Veterinary Medical Association in 1981 to say thanks to the pets that fill our lives with love, happiness, and companionship.

Another goal for National Pet Week is to encourage responsible pet parenting. There are plenty of ways to show your gratitude to your pets while also making sure that you are being the best pet parent you can be.

Here are seven ways you can say thanks to cats during National Pet Week while being a responsible pet parent and further enriching cats’ lives.

1. Think About Your Cat’s Food

Many cat parents settle for the same store-bought food day after day for years. Not only does this seem boring for our cats, it may also not be the best choice for their health or well-being.

National Pet Week is as good a time as any to start thinking about your cat’s nutritional needs. Consult your veterinarian, talk to a professional nutritionist, and do your own research.

There are many kinds of food and supplements that can give your cat a major health boost, improve their energy levels, and provide them with some desperately needed dietary variety.

Cats’ have need that change from kittenhood to adulthood and senior years when it comes to food, and you should address these needs accordingly. Your vet should give you advice on altering portion sizes and nutritional requirements as your cat ages.

Try making your cat’s food, yourself, instead of relying on pre-made, store-bought cat food. You’d be surprised by how affordable it is, how fun and easy it can be to make, and how much your kitty will appreciate the extra effort. Here are a few resources you may find helpful:

2. Get Active With Your Cat

A ginger cat plays with some cat toys

(Picture Credit: Getty Images)

National Pet Week can be a great time to form some good new habits. Your cat may seem like they’re just fine being lazy and not exercising, but it can be harmful to their health.

When cats don’t get enough exercise, they may gain weight, and obesity causes all kinds of other health issues. It can lead to diabetes, worsen stress on joints for cats that have arthritis, and cause heart disease among other conditions.

A lack of exercise can also lead to boredom, which might increase anxiety and destructive behavior. Try playing with your cat in more active ways.

Cats have natural hunting instincts and often find toys that allow them to stalk, chase, and pounce to be mentally stimulating, as well as physically challenging.

Here are some things you should read about giving cats the right amount of exercise:

3. Plan Your Yearly Vet Visits

Regular vet visits are important for making sure that your cat is in good health and getting the medical care they need.

If you’re not sure when their last vet visit was or when you should be planning your cat’s next check-up, National Pet Week is as good a time as any to reach out to your veterinarian and find out when you should be planning to bring your kitty in.

Your cat may not thank you at first, as very few actually enjoy their vet visits, but they will be healthier in the long run.

4. Put Your Emergency Kit Together

Vet putting a bandage around a cat’s leg.

(Picture Credit: Getty Images)

Do you have a kitty first-aid kit put together? How about an emergency pack just in case you need to care for your cat in a disaster?

You should always hope for the best and prepare for the worst because it’s better to have this stuff ready and not need it than to need it and not have it.

Make sure you know the basics of cat first aid so you can help your kitty if something goes wrong. Have an emergency preparedness kit ready to go if the worst happens.

If you already have these kits ready to go, National Pet Week may be a good time to look them over and replace anything that needs replacing. Here are some resources you may find helpful:

5. Volunteer

If you’d like to help other pets in need find forever homes, consider volunteering at your local animal shelter. Animal shelters are typically not run for profit, so they rely on volunteers to help out and care for cats and other pets in the facility.

Don’t just show up. Call ahead and ask about volunteer opportunities. Even if there aren’t any positions currently available, you can always host a fundraising event through your club, team, group, or community that can help shelters get what they need.

If you want to know more about how to volunteer at an animal shelter, click here.

6. Foster Or Adopt

Family adopting cat from animal shelter taking her home

(Picture Credit: Getty Images)

Of course, one of the best ways to thank cats during National Pet Week is to take one home and into your care.

Adopting and fostering don’t just help the cat that you take home. They also help free up resources at animal shelters so that other cats and animals can get the attention and supplies that they need while they wait to find forever homes of their own.

If you aren’t ready to jump into the lifelong commitment of adopting, fostering is a great way to test the waters and see if you’re able to handle the responsibility that comes with pet parenting.

Animal shelters often reimburse foster pet parents for certain expenses and take care of any medical needs. You’d help a cat learn socialization skills that can help them get adopted, too.

Consider opening your home to a kitty in need, even if it’s only for a short time.

7. Spoil Your Cat

Your cat showers you with love all year long, and chances are good that you return that affection in full, but why not take National Pet Week as an opportunity to go above and beyond?

Get some new toys. Replace old litter boxes. Look for a new cat tree or perch. If you need some ideas about what to buy for your kitty, check out these resources:

What other ways can you say thanks to cats during National Pet Week? Are you doing anything special for your kitty? Let us know in the comments below!

Catégories
La vie du chat

Chip Your Pet Month: The Ins & Outs Of Microchips For Cats


Veterinarian identify cat by microchip implant

(Picture Credit: LuckyBusiness/Getty Images)

May is peak spring time for many of us, but it’s also Chip Your Pet Month.

A lot of cat parents don’t know exactly what a microchip does or why it’s important for pets. Some believe that indoor cats don’t even need a microchip — or any form of identification for that matter.

However, the fact is that microchips make it much more likely for a lost pet to reunite with their humans. Petfinder cites a study that says only two percent of lost cats who entered shelters made it back to their humans. But that rate jumped up to 38 percent for lost cats who had microchips.

So if you haven’t yet had your cat microchipped, here are the ins and outs of why it’s something you really need to get around to doing — and Chip Your Pet Month is as good a time to do it as any!

So What’s Microchipping All About?

A veterinarian is injecting a microchip between the shoulder blades of a young cat.

(Picture Credit: DenGuy/Getty Images)

Remember the olden days when every cat wore a necklace with a name tag around their neck that also included their humans’ contact details?

Well, think of microchipping as the modern, updated version of that. In the unfortunate case of your cat getting lost, checking for a microchip can be an effective way to track down your information and reunite you with your kitty.

Almost every veterinary office, shelter, and even many police stations have equipment to read your cat’s microchip. If someone turns your lost cat in at any of these facilities, your feline has a far better chance of coming back home to you.

What’s The Microchip Like?

cat getting microchip

(Picture Credit: Getty Images)

When it comes to microchipping cats, the actual chip is tiny. Think around the size of a small grain of rice.

A vet inserts it under a cat’s skin with the use of a needle, usually between the shoulder blades. And don’t worry — microchips are non-toxic.

Oh, and don’t confuse the microchip with a GPS system. It will not track every movement of your feline’s life.

How Do I Get My Cat Microchipped?

cat with collar

(Picture Credit: Getty Images)

Vets and local shelters are your best bet for getting your cat microchipped.

Costs can vary, but a vet will usually charge around $50 for the process; although, you may get a better deal if you ask for a microchip as part of a regular wellness visit. Your pet’s information will also be added to a database as part of the process.

cat getting scanned

(Picture Credit: Getty Images)

Also, if you adopted your cat from a shelter, go back and check their paperwork. There’s a strong chance your cat is already fully microchipped up.

The next step will be to just update the database with your information, and the shelter can help you do that.

If you’re in search of a low cost option, keep a lookout for shelters and animal organizations running chip-a-thons where discounts are often offered.

Does My Cat Still Need A Tag?

cat with collar looking at kids

(Picture Credit: Getty Images)

In an ideal situation, yes, your cat should also have a tag!

Microchipping cats can be useful if they get lost and are brought to a rescue or a shelter. However, if an average person finds your cat, they likely won’t have access to a scanner to check for a microchip.

They might not know about microchips or the steps they should take when they find a lost pet. That’s when a name tag with a phone number comes in ever so handy.

Be safe and double up! Never let your cat out without a chip or collar identification.

Does your cat have a microchip? Will you help spread the word for Chip Your Pet Month? Let us know in the comments below!

Catégories
La vie du chat

Abyssinian – Catster


In the Abyssinian alphabet, A is for active, M is for mischievous and S is for super smart. The agile and athletic cats are known for their love of heights, lively nature and unquenchable curiosity.

“Abys are very energetic, and that takes some people by surprise,” says Linda Kay Hardie, who has lived with 19 Abys over 30-plus years. “I have one Aby I got from a breeder after she got him back from the woman who had taken him. She wasn’t prepared for the energy level.”

Related: Meet Racy Mooner, an Elegant and Athletic Abyssinian Cat

With a ticked coat, large ears, wedge-shaped head and lithe but muscular body, the Aby resembles his far distant ancestor, the African wildcat (Felis lybica). Affectionate, fun loving and sociable, Abys can do well in many different types of homes with different types of people — with some caveats. Their quick movements and tendency to wend between legs can make them a hazard around people who aren’t steady on their feet, including seniors and toddlers. And they like to have company. If you’re not around during the day, an Aby will appreciate the company of another cat or a friendly dog.

“A good home is one with lots of love and attention to share with their Aby … and a love for a very athletic, high-jumping, counter-sitting, food-stealing, thrill-seeking, mischief-making, zany, lovable cat,” says Aby expert Jean Papo of Abytopia Abyssinians in Oregon.

Abyssinian cat.
Abyssinian cats are very trainable and may enjoy walking on a leash. Photography ©1lermannika l Thinkstock.

Living with an Abyssinian Cat

  • The Aby doesn’t have a reputation as a lap cat, but many owners say their cats are exceptions — at least for brief periods.
  • Abys are highly trainable and amenable to walking on leash. Expect them to set the pace.
  • The shorthaired Abyssinian is an easy keeper, requiring only weekly brushing to keep his sleek coat in top condition. He sheds, but not heavily.
  • This entertaining cat isn’t shy about sharing his silly side, leading to the common nickname “Aby-silly-an.” Aby owner Scott Peterson says, “They’re like clowns in a European circus. They’re funny, but there’s a dignity to everything they do that you can’t miss.”

History of the Abyssinian

  • A cat named Zula, brought back from Abyssinia (now Ethiopia) in 1868, was the first cat called an Abyssinian.
  • Thanks to the science of DNA, we know that the ancestors of Abys likely originated along the coast of the Indian Ocean and in Southeast Asia.
  • British breeders developed the Abyssinian we know and love today. The cats didn’t cross the pond to America until the early 20th century. An Aby was first exhibited in the U.S. in Boston in 1909.
  • Abyssinians are the ninth most popular breed registered by the Cat Fanciers’ Association.
Abyssinian close up with whiskers.
An Aby can live up to 12 to 15 years — or more. Photography by Casey Elise Photography.

What you should know about the Abyssinian

  1. The Aby is a medium-size cat weighing 6 to 12 pounds. Abys typically reach full physical maturity by the time they are a year old.
  2. An Aby’s soft, silky coat has a fine texture and is described as “ticked” or “agouti”: contrasting light- and dark-colored bands on each hair shaft. The ticked coat is caused by the tabby gene, and some Abys have the well-known tabby M-shaped marking on their forehead.
  3. Abys come in four colors: ruddy, red (also known as sorrel), blue and fawn. Some registries also recognize the color silver. Their green or gold eyes, with dark rims, offer a striking contrast.
  4. The Abyssinian is generally healthy and can live to 12 to 15 years or more. Potential health problems include patellar luxation and severe gingivitis (gum disease), known as “Aby mouth.” Stringent dental care is a must for this breed.
  5. Marybeth Rymer, D.V.M., who has had Abys for 25 years, says genetic diseases that can affect their quality of life and shorten their years are a red blood cell disease called erythrocyte pyruvate kinase deficiency; a kidney disease called amyloidosis; and progressive retinal atrophy, which can cause blindness. “I advise potential owners to ask breeders if their cats are tested for these diseases and if they are aware of amyloidosis in their lines,” she says.

Fun Facts About the Abyssinian

  1. Abys are intelligent and crafty.
  2. If you don’t want a cat on your counters or inside your cabinets, this isn’t the cat for you.
  3. They’ve even been known to defeat childproof locks, Hardie says.
  4. Two Abyssinians starred as Jake, the feline protagonist of the 1978 film The Cat From Outer Space.
  5. The first cat to have her genome sequenced was an Aby named Cinnamon.

Read Next: Fall in Love With These 5 Large Cat Breeds

Catégories
La vie du chat

Abyssinian – Catster


In the Abyssinian alphabet, A is for active, M is for mischievous and S is for super smart. The agile and athletic cats are known for their love of heights, lively nature and unquenchable curiosity.

“Abys are very energetic, and that takes some people by surprise,” says Linda Kay Hardie, who has lived with 19 Abys over 30-plus years. “I have one Aby I got from a breeder after she got him back from the woman who had taken him. She wasn’t prepared for the energy level.”

Related: Meet Racy Mooner, an Elegant and Athletic Abyssinian Cat

With a ticked coat, large ears, wedge-shaped head and lithe but muscular body, the Aby resembles his far distant ancestor, the African wildcat (Felis lybica). Affectionate, fun loving and sociable, Abys can do well in many different types of homes with different types of people — with some caveats. Their quick movements and tendency to wend between legs can make them a hazard around people who aren’t steady on their feet, including seniors and toddlers. And they like to have company. If you’re not around during the day, an Aby will appreciate the company of another cat or a friendly dog.

“A good home is one with lots of love and attention to share with their Aby … and a love for a very athletic, high-jumping, counter-sitting, food-stealing, thrill-seeking, mischief-making, zany, lovable cat,” says Aby expert Jean Papo of Abytopia Abyssinians in Oregon.

Abyssinian cat.
Abyssinian cats are very trainable and may enjoy walking on a leash. Photography ©1lermannika l Thinkstock.

Living with an Abyssinian Cat

  • The Aby doesn’t have a reputation as a lap cat, but many owners say their cats are exceptions — at least for brief periods.
  • Abys are highly trainable and amenable to walking on leash. Expect them to set the pace.
  • The shorthaired Abyssinian is an easy keeper, requiring only weekly brushing to keep his sleek coat in top condition. He sheds, but not heavily.
  • This entertaining cat isn’t shy about sharing his silly side, leading to the common nickname “Aby-silly-an.” Aby owner Scott Peterson says, “They’re like clowns in a European circus. They’re funny, but there’s a dignity to everything they do that you can’t miss.”

History of the Abyssinian

  • A cat named Zula, brought back from Abyssinia (now Ethiopia) in 1868, was the first cat called an Abyssinian.
  • Thanks to the science of DNA, we know that the ancestors of Abys likely originated along the coast of the Indian Ocean and in Southeast Asia.
  • British breeders developed the Abyssinian we know and love today. The cats didn’t cross the pond to America until the early 20th century. An Aby was first exhibited in the U.S. in Boston in 1909.
  • Abyssinians are the ninth most popular breed registered by the Cat Fanciers’ Association.
Abyssinian close up with whiskers.
An Aby can live up to 12 to 15 years — or more. Photography by Casey Elise Photography.

What you should know about the Abyssinian

  1. The Aby is a medium-size cat weighing 6 to 12 pounds. Abys typically reach full physical maturity by the time they are a year old.
  2. An Aby’s soft, silky coat has a fine texture and is described as “ticked” or “agouti”: contrasting light- and dark-colored bands on each hair shaft. The ticked coat is caused by the tabby gene, and some Abys have the well-known tabby M-shaped marking on their forehead.
  3. Abys come in four colors: ruddy, red (also known as sorrel), blue and fawn. Some registries also recognize the color silver. Their green or gold eyes, with dark rims, offer a striking contrast.
  4. The Abyssinian is generally healthy and can live to 12 to 15 years or more. Potential health problems include patellar luxation and severe gingivitis (gum disease), known as “Aby mouth.” Stringent dental care is a must for this breed.
  5. Marybeth Rymer, D.V.M., who has had Abys for 25 years, says genetic diseases that can affect their quality of life and shorten their years are a red blood cell disease called erythrocyte pyruvate kinase deficiency; a kidney disease called amyloidosis; and progressive retinal atrophy, which can cause blindness. “I advise potential owners to ask breeders if their cats are tested for these diseases and if they are aware of amyloidosis in their lines,” she says.

Fun Facts About the Abyssinian

  1. Abys are intelligent and crafty.
  2. If you don’t want a cat on your counters or inside your cabinets, this isn’t the cat for you.
  3. They’ve even been known to defeat childproof locks, Hardie says.
  4. Two Abyssinians starred as Jake, the feline protagonist of the 1978 film The Cat From Outer Space.
  5. The first cat to have her genome sequenced was an Aby named Cinnamon.

Read Next: Fall in Love With These 5 Large Cat Breeds

Catégories
La vie du chat

What’s Mew at Catster: May Events


The post What’s Mew at Catster: May Events by Annie Butler Shirreffs appeared first on Catster. Copying over entire articles infringes on copyright laws. You may not be aware of it, but all of these articles were assigned, contracted and paid for, so they aren’t considered public domain. However, we appreciate that you like the article and would love it if you continued sharing just the first paragraph of an article, then linking out to the rest of the piece on Catster.com.

All Month: Pet Cancer Awareness Month; National Pet Month; Responsible Animal Guardian Month; Chip Your Pet Month

©Natallia Dzenisenka | Getty Images

1-7: Be Kind to Animals Week

This weeklong celebration was created to acknowledge and appreciate the efforts made to ensure animal safety and aims to spread awareness about the need to be kind to animals, and to protect them and their habitats. Let’s be kind to every animal we come across during this week – and always!

1: Makin’ Strides for Strays

This annual walkathon raises funds for A.D.O.P.T. Pet Shelter. The 2.5-mile walk through downtown Naperville includes vendor booths, food and music at Naperville Central High School Stadium Parking lot in Naperville, Illinois. A.D.O.P.T. Pet Shelter is a private, no-kill animal shelter that provides temporary shelter and care to cats and dogs in search of their forever homes. Learn more at adoptpetshelter.org.

3 Specially-abled Pets Day

This day shines a spotlight on the special needs of pets with disabilities and encourages animal lovers to consider choosing a disabled pet when looking to adopt. Even though they have special needs, they can still bring much love and joy to a home.

Trap-neuter-return improves the lives of feral cats and their relationship with the community. Photography ©Dovapi | Getty Images.
Trap-neuter-return improves the lives of feral cats and their relationship with the community. Photography ©Dovapi | Getty Images.

7: The Community Cats Podcast – Neighborhood Cats Trapper Certification Webinar

Be part of the solution for feral stray cats in your neighborhood by checking out The Community Cats Podcast’s Neighborhood Cats TNR Certification Workshop. Expert instructors will teach you best practices for trap-neuter-return and colony management. The webinar costs $10 and takes place from 2 to 4:30 p.m. EST. Get more information here.

A Persian kitten was one of the prize winners in 1871 at the world’s first cat show, held at the Crystal Palace in London. At the time, they were listed as French Persian (Angora) cats. Photography ©GlobalP | Getty Images.
Meet gorgeous breeds at this annual Allbreed CFA cat show. Photography ©GlobalP | Getty Images.

7: 45th Annual Allbreed CFA Cat Show

Presented by Anthony Wayne Cat Fanciers, Inc., this show will feature five Allbreed rings, 1 Specialty ring and 6 Household Pet rings. Takes place at Monroe Community College. Click here for more information.

7-8: 43rd Annual CFA Allbreed Cat Show

Presented by Seacoast Cat Club, this show will feature eight Allbreed rings, two Specialty rings and 10 Household Pet rings. Takes place at Everett Arena in Concord, New Hampshire. Learn more here.

A cat posing with an emergency preparedness kit.
A cat posing with an emergency preparedness kit. Photography ©Monika Wisniewska | Alamy Stock Photo.

14 Animal Disaster Preparedness Day

Do you have a plan in the event of a natural disaster? If not, today is the perfect day to put one in place. Our pets look to us to keep them safe, so it’s important to know what to do before disaster strikes.

Here are some tips from FEMA to prepare a pet emergency go-kit:

  • First-aid items for each pet in the household.
  • A three-day supply of water and food for each pet.
  • Pet-care supplies, like food and water bowls, waste bags and a leash and collar/harness
  • Your pet’s medications
  • Copies of your pet’s veterinarian records
  • Contact information for you, as well as for other family members in case you can’t be reached
  • Photos of your pet, along with photos of you with your pet in case you get separated
  • Comfy items from home to help keep your pet relaxed, like a favorite toy or blanket
  • Pet carriers within easy reach

21 Wild in the Country 2022

This fundraiser benefits the Lions, Tigers & Bears Big Cat & Exotic Animal Rescue in San Diego County, California. For tickets and more information, visit lionstigersandbears.org.

21: World Wide Feline Fanciers Cat Show

This CFA cat show will be held at Agner Hall, Lawrenceburg Indiana Fairgrounds in Lawrenceburg, Indiana. Visit cfa.org for more information.

22: The 24th Annual Furball Cattyshack

This golf-inspired fundraiser takes place at Langdon Farms Golf Club in Aurora, Oregon, and benefits the Feral Cat Coalition of Oregon. For more information, visit feralcats.com.

28-29: The Edmonton International Cat Festival Virtual Pawty

This annual festival celebrates cats and cat culture while raising money and awareness for rescues. Due to the ongoing pandemic, the event will be virtual again this year. Visit edmontoncatfest.com for more information.

The post What’s Mew at Catster: May Events by Annie Butler Shirreffs appeared first on Catster. Copying over entire articles infringes on copyright laws. You may not be aware of it, but all of these articles were assigned, contracted and paid for, so they aren’t considered public domain. However, we appreciate that you like the article and would love it if you continued sharing just the first paragraph of an article, then linking out to the rest of the piece on Catster.com.

Catégories
La vie du chat

What’s Mew at Catster: May Events


The post What’s Mew at Catster: May Events by Annie Butler Shirreffs appeared first on Catster. Copying over entire articles infringes on copyright laws. You may not be aware of it, but all of these articles were assigned, contracted and paid for, so they aren’t considered public domain. However, we appreciate that you like the article and would love it if you continued sharing just the first paragraph of an article, then linking out to the rest of the piece on Catster.com.

All Month: Pet Cancer Awareness Month; National Pet Month; Responsible Animal Guardian Month; Chip Your Pet Month

©Natallia Dzenisenka | Getty Images

1-7: Be Kind to Animals Week

This weeklong celebration was created to acknowledge and appreciate the efforts made to ensure animal safety and aims to spread awareness about the need to be kind to animals, and to protect them and their habitats. Let’s be kind to every animal we come across during this week – and always!

1: Makin’ Strides for Strays

This annual walkathon raises funds for A.D.O.P.T. Pet Shelter. The 2.5-mile walk through downtown Naperville includes vendor booths, food and music at Naperville Central High School Stadium Parking lot in Naperville, Illinois. A.D.O.P.T. Pet Shelter is a private, no-kill animal shelter that provides temporary shelter and care to cats and dogs in search of their forever homes. Learn more at adoptpetshelter.org.

3 Specially-abled Pets Day

This day shines a spotlight on the special needs of pets with disabilities and encourages animal lovers to consider choosing a disabled pet when looking to adopt. Even though they have special needs, they can still bring much love and joy to a home.

Trap-neuter-return improves the lives of feral cats and their relationship with the community. Photography ©Dovapi | Getty Images.
Trap-neuter-return improves the lives of feral cats and their relationship with the community. Photography ©Dovapi | Getty Images.

7: The Community Cats Podcast – Neighborhood Cats Trapper Certification Webinar

Be part of the solution for feral stray cats in your neighborhood by checking out The Community Cats Podcast’s Neighborhood Cats TNR Certification Workshop. Expert instructors will teach you best practices for trap-neuter-return and colony management. The webinar costs $10 and takes place from 2 to 4:30 p.m. EST. Get more information here.

A Persian kitten was one of the prize winners in 1871 at the world’s first cat show, held at the Crystal Palace in London. At the time, they were listed as French Persian (Angora) cats. Photography ©GlobalP | Getty Images.
Meet gorgeous breeds at this annual Allbreed CFA cat show. Photography ©GlobalP | Getty Images.

7: 45th Annual Allbreed CFA Cat Show

Presented by Anthony Wayne Cat Fanciers, Inc., this show will feature five Allbreed rings, 1 Specialty ring and 6 Household Pet rings. Takes place at Monroe Community College. Click here for more information.

7-8: 43rd Annual CFA Allbreed Cat Show

Presented by Seacoast Cat Club, this show will feature eight Allbreed rings, two Specialty rings and 10 Household Pet rings. Takes place at Everett Arena in Concord, New Hampshire. Learn more here.

A cat posing with an emergency preparedness kit.
A cat posing with an emergency preparedness kit. Photography ©Monika Wisniewska | Alamy Stock Photo.

14 Animal Disaster Preparedness Day

Do you have a plan in the event of a natural disaster? If not, today is the perfect day to put one in place. Our pets look to us to keep them safe, so it’s important to know what to do before disaster strikes.

Here are some tips from FEMA to prepare a pet emergency go-kit:

  • First-aid items for each pet in the household.
  • A three-day supply of water and food for each pet.
  • Pet-care supplies, like food and water bowls, waste bags and a leash and collar/harness
  • Your pet’s medications
  • Copies of your pet’s veterinarian records
  • Contact information for you, as well as for other family members in case you can’t be reached
  • Photos of your pet, along with photos of you with your pet in case you get separated
  • Comfy items from home to help keep your pet relaxed, like a favorite toy or blanket
  • Pet carriers within easy reach

21 Wild in the Country 2022

This fundraiser benefits the Lions, Tigers & Bears Big Cat & Exotic Animal Rescue in San Diego County, California. For tickets and more information, visit lionstigersandbears.org.

21: World Wide Feline Fanciers Cat Show

This CFA cat show will be held at Agner Hall, Lawrenceburg Indiana Fairgrounds in Lawrenceburg, Indiana. Visit cfa.org for more information.

22: The 24th Annual Furball Cattyshack

This golf-inspired fundraiser takes place at Langdon Farms Golf Club in Aurora, Oregon, and benefits the Feral Cat Coalition of Oregon. For more information, visit feralcats.com.

28-29: The Edmonton International Cat Festival Virtual Pawty

This annual festival celebrates cats and cat culture while raising money and awareness for rescues. Due to the ongoing pandemic, the event will be virtual again this year. Visit edmontoncatfest.com for more information.

The post What’s Mew at Catster: May Events by Annie Butler Shirreffs appeared first on Catster. Copying over entire articles infringes on copyright laws. You may not be aware of it, but all of these articles were assigned, contracted and paid for, so they aren’t considered public domain. However, we appreciate that you like the article and would love it if you continued sharing just the first paragraph of an article, then linking out to the rest of the piece on Catster.com.

Catégories
La vie du chat

Review: Cats Work Like This


cats-work-like-this

We all want to know more about what our cats think and why they do the things they do. In Cats Work Like This, the authors offers insights from two generations of observing cats.

From the publisher:

Though there are many famous felines, it is the day to day cat which provides the most enduring interest. Though each one’s behaviour and mannerisms are unique, we can find enough practices in common to guide you to becoming an expert in how cats work. … Learn how cats practice their values and explore what your cats know about you. Find out what cats do while you sleep, what a cat’s eyes can tell you …  With a focus on attention, emotion, cute affection, manipulation, cunning and cussedness, Cats Work Like This gives … insight into the workings of a cat’s elusive mind.

Featuring beautiful 4-color photographs, this tongue-in-cheek guide addresses such topics as where your cat likes to sit, what your cat thinks of you, and how cats make sure we know they’re in charge.

I found the section on food particularly amusing. The authors posit that we are nothing more than proxy for their prey (after all, we’re the ones who can operate the can opener.) “You are going to be stalked. If you are not already in the kitchen, your cat will locate you. Believe me, they always know where you are.”

This delightful little book makes a great gift for yourself or your cat loving friends.

Cats Work Like This is available from Amazon.

buy-from-amazon-blue

*The Conscious Cat is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for us to earn fees by linking to Amazon.com and affiliated sites. This means that if you decide to purchase through any of our links, we get a small commission. We only spread the word about products and services we’ve either used or would use ourselves. I received this book from the publisher. Receiving the complimentary copy did not influence my review.

Catégories
La vie du chat

Cat Picked Up from Farm Learns to Trust Knowing Her Kittens Will Live Better Life


A cat who was picked up from a farm, learned to trust knowing her kittens would live a better life.

tabby cat pregnantAlba the catChatons Orphelins Montréal

A colony of cats who had found their way to a farm, were in need of rescue. They lived in poor conditions, and many of them needed immediate medical attention.

Julie, an animal rescuer, was informed about the situation and stepped up to help. One by one, she was able to bring the cats and kittens to safety, so no more babies would be born outside in the cold.

Chatons Orphelins Montréal, an animal rescue in Montreal, Canada, took them all into their care. Among the cats, there was a tabby named Alba who was pregnant and scared.

farm catsShe was one of the many cats rescued from a farmChatons Orphelins Montréal

After a much-needed vet visit, she was taken into a foster home where she was introduced to indoor life for the first time. « She was very hungry and slept a lot, » Celine Crom of Chatons Orphelins Montréal shared with Love Meow.

« She was placed in a quiet room with an unlimited amount of food. Alba was very shy at first but gradually warmed up to her foster family. »

indoor cat lifeAlba was very shy at first but quickly learned to appreciate indoor lifeChatons Orphelins Montréal

The sweet tabby cat got a taste of luxury being indoors with a room all to herself, a clean, cozy nest to sleep in, and plenty of good food at her disposal.

She came out of her shell, and even started to approach her people and seek affection from them.

tabby pregnant catShe worked up the courage to seek affection from her foster momChatons Orphelins Montréal

« Her belly grew every day. On March 10th, she gave birth to five healthy babies in a safe place, » Celine told Love Meow.

« Mama Alba was still very thin and wasn’t able to produce sufficient milk for all the hungry mouths, so her foster family began supplementing the kittens around the clock. »

cat mom kittensAlba gave birth to five healthy kittens in the comfort of a loving homeChatons Orphelins Montréal

Alba’s confidence continued to grow as she realized that her family of six were in great hands. She was so content with all the soft things to knead on, and purred and slow-blinked at her foster mom every time she came in to the room.

Watch Alba and her kittens in this sweet video:

Alba the cat and her kittenswww.youtube.com

She was relieved to get some much-needed assistance to feed her demanding babies, and started to take small breaks to replenish with food and love from her humans.

cat mom snuggles kittensShe was glad to get some help to feed her demanding babiesChatons Orphelins Montréal

« Alba and her kittens are doing well thanks to the care of their foster mom. She loves her new life with people and allows them to handle her babies while purring up a storm. »

The formerly timid farm cat has transformed into a happy, affectionate tabby girl. She doesn’t mind other furry residents in the house and enjoys their company when they stop by for a visit.

cat mom nursing babiesThe kittens grew by leaps and bounds and Alba became more confident each dayChatons Orphelins Montréal

« The kittens are now big enough to eat on their own, but they still nurse on their mom for comfort, » Celine shared with Love Meow.

Alba is a wonderful mother who doesn’t mind her kittens’ neediness and tolerates their many antics. « She loves talking or chirping to them. They are all healthy and gaining lots of weight every day. »

nursing cat kittensChatons Orphelins Montréal

After roaming outside for the first two years of her life, Alba is loving her new chapter as an indoor cat. She is glowing with her babies cuddled up to her as she naps.

cat mom kittens cuddlingSweetest cuddle puddleChatons Orphelins Montréal

Share this story with your friends. Follow updates on the family and Chatons Orphelins Montréal on Facebook and Instagram @comrescuemontreal.

Related story: Kitten Found in a Bush, Picks Puppy to Be Her Family and Decides to Adopt Him Herself

Catégories
La vie du chat

5 Reasons to Adopt a Special Needs Cat


Deciding to add a cat to your family is an important decision that warrants plenty of thought and planning. It’s exciting, of course, but we can’t forget that cats are long-term commitments. Their needs go beyond food and a place to sleep, and finding the right cat for your family might take time. Many people are attracted to kittens, especially the ones that frolic and tumble and cuddle. Young, friendly adult cats are also likely to find good homes. But while you’re thinking about the kind of cat that will fit in best with your lifestyle, don’t forget about the ones that don’t stand out from the crowd. Cats with special needs are just as deserving, loving, and companionable as all the others. Whether they have a physical disability, require regular medication, or experienced past trauma, special needs cats are often forgotten and ignored. Here are the top five reasons why a special needs cat might be exactly what you’re looking for.

why you should adopt a special needs cat

When you offer a special needs cat a loving home, you give them a chance they might not otherwise get.

Make a Real Difference and Save a Life

When you adopt from an animal shelter or take in a homeless animal, you make a positive difference for that one animal and several others. Every time a rescue animal is adopted, the shelter receives the monetary support they need to continue saving lives. At the same time, resources are made available to help even more animals in need. When you adopt a special needs cat, those benefits are matched by the knowledge that you are truly making a difference for a cat in need.

Every cat at the shelter deserves a good home, but some cats have better chances of leaving the shelter than others. Those playful kittens and social adults probably don’t have long to wait behind a kennel door. It’s the cats that require more attention, care, and commitment that are at risk of either euthanasia or spending months in a shelter environment that is not ideal for their well-being. When you offer a special needs cat a loving home, you give them a chance they might not otherwise get. 

adopt a special needs cat

Special needs cats form friendships and generally enjoy themselves as long as their needs are met.

Be Inspired

There are several words that could describe a particular special needs cat, but none are more appropriate than the word, “resilient.” Regardless of the cat’s specific needs, animals that overcome physical or emotional challenges are always inspirational. You can look at a cat with a medical condition and see how even though they’re in pain or restricted in some way, they still find ways to enjoy life. They purr, snuggle, and play with toys. Special needs cats form friendships and generally enjoy themselves as long as their needs are met. 

When life gets hard or we’re faced with our own physical or mental disabilities, a special needs cat can be a powerful influence. Not only do cats provide invaluable companionship and love, they can also inspire us to keep going and to focus on the positive. Letting a special needs cat into your home can change your life as well as theirs.

adopt a special needs cat

As with any new pet, forming a bond with a special needs cat might take time. Many of these cats have experienced past trauma.

Feel a Powerful Bond

While every bond you share with an animal is special, there is something about special needs cats that makes a friendship even more meaningful. Maybe it’s the fact that they are more dependent on us, or it might be because they sense our compassion and empathy. Whatever the reason, adopting a special needs cat is often the beginning of a beautiful friendship.

As with any new pet, forming a bond with a special needs cat might take time. Many of these cats have experienced past trauma. They could be understandably afraid, nervous, or wary. But when you take the time to earn their trust, they often embrace their new life with genuine joy and affection. These feelings of connection with a vulnerable being are soothing to the soul.

adopt a special needs cat

Even people who have had other pets in the past are surprised by the powerful emotions they feel for a special needs animal.

Learn Something About Yourself

We often don’t know what we’re capable of until after we’ve already crossed our perceived limits and jumped our supposed hurdles. You might think you don’t have the heart to care for an animal with a disability or the strength to support a cat that struggles in some way. It’s important to note that adopting a special needs cat isn’t right for everyone, but it can expose strengths and emotions you didn’t know you have. 

Even people who have had other pets in the past are surprised by the powerful emotions they feel for a special needs animal. Allowing yourself to love an animal that is vulnerable and dependent has a way of opening you up and exposing personal characteristics that might have otherwise remained hidden.

adopt a special needs cat

By accepting a special needs cat into your family, you instantly become an advocate for all cats with similar impairments.

Become an Advocate

With an estimated 3.2 million cats living in U.S. animal shelters right this second, there is an extreme need for people willing to adopt. Every single one of those cats deserves a good home, but it’s the special needs cat that often suffers the most. They’re the ones that potential adopters walk past because they’re deemed to be too much work or too much of a commitment. Some people simply don’t think they’re capable of providing a special needs animal with the care they require. And while it’s a win every time an animal leaves a shelter, it’s an even bigger occasion when that animal has some kind of disability or restriction. 

By accepting a special needs cat into your family, you instantly become an advocate for all cats with similar impairments. You have an opportunity to show your network of friends, family, and social media followers that special needs cats are just as wonderful as any other animal. It’s your chance to inspire others and spread a positive message. Your personal experience with your cat could be the push someone else needs to follow in your footsteps and save yet another vulnerable life. It’s a snowball effect that could go on to make a big difference for countless other cats.